WebStorm 9.0.2 Web Help

Preparing to Use Cucumber.js Test Runner

The Cucumber.js test runner supports executing unit tests against the Node.js server. Cucumber.js runs tests that are called features and are written in the Gherkin language. Each feature is described in a separate file with the extension feature. Feature files are marked with the fileTypeCucumber icon.

On this page:

Preparing to install Cucumber.js

  1. Download and install Node.js. The framework is required for two reasons:
    • The Cucumber.js test runner is started through Node.js.
    • NPM, which is a part of the framework, is also the easiest way to download the Cucumber.js test runner.

  2. If you are going to use the command line mode, make sure the following paths are added to the PATH variable:
    1. The path to the parent folder of the Node.js executable file.
    2. The path to the npm folder.

    This enables you to launch the Cucumber.js test runner and npm from any folder.

  3. Make sure the Node.js plugin is enabled. The plugin is bundled with WebStorm and activated by default. If it is not, enable it as described in Enabling and Disabling Plugins.
  4. Make sure the Cucumber.js and Gherkin plugins are enabled. The plugins are bundled with WebStorm and activated by default. If not, enable them as described in Enabling and Disabling Plugins.

Installing the Cucumber.js Test Runner

The easiest way to install the Cucumber.js test runner is to use the Node Package Manager (npm), which is a part of Node.js.

Depending on the desired location of the Cucumber.js test runner executable file, choose one of the following methods:

  • Install the test runner globally at the WebStorm level so it can be used in any WebStorm project.
  • Install the test runner in a specific project and thus restrict its use to this project.
  • Install the test runner in a project as a development dependency.

In either installation mode, make sure that the parent folder of the Cucumber.js test runner is added to the PATH variable. This enables you to launch the test runner from any folder.

WebStorm provides user interface both for global and project installation as well as supports installation through the command line.

Installing Cucumber.js globally

  1. Run the installation from the command line in the global mode:
    1. Launch the embedded Terminal by hovering your mouse pointer over show_tool_window_bars in the lower left corner of WebStorm and choosing Terminal from the menu (see Working with Embedded Local Terminal for details).
    2. Switch to the directory where NPM is stored or define a PATH variable for it so it is available from any folder, see Installing NodeJs.
    3. Type the following command at the command line prompt:
      npm install -g cucumber

      For more details on the NPM operation modes, see npm documentation. For more information about installing the Cucumber.js test runner, see https://npmjs.org/package/cucumber.

  2. Run NPM from WebStorm using the Node.js and NPM page of the Settings dialog box.
    1. Open the Settings dialog box by choosing File | Settings or pressing Ctrl+Alt+S and click Node.js and NPM under Languages&Frameworks.
    2. On the Node.js and NPM page that opens, the Packages area shows all the Node.js-dependent packages that are currently installed on your computer, both at the global and at the project level. Click add.
    3. In the Available Packages dialog box that opens, select the cucumber package.
    4. Select the Options check box and type -g in the text box next to it.
    5. Optionally specify the product version and click Install Package to start installation.

Installing Cucumber.js in a project

  • Run the installation from the command line:
    1. Launch the embedded Terminal by hovering your mouse pointer over show_tool_window_bars in the lower left corner of WebStorm and choosing Terminal from the menu (see Working with Embedded Local Terminal for details).
    2. Switch to the directory where NPM is stored or define a PATH variable for it so it is available from any folder, see Installing NodeJs.
    3. Type the following command at the command line prompt:
      npm install cucumber
  • Run NPM from WebStorm using the Node.js and NPM page of the Settings dialog box.
    1. Open the Settings dialog box by choosing File | Settings or pressing Ctrl+Alt+S and click Node.js and NPM under Languages&Frameworks.
    2. On the Node.js and NPM page that opens, the Packages area shows all the Node.js-dependent packages that are currently installed on your computer, both at the global and at the project level. Click add.
    3. In the Available Packages dialog box that opens, select the cucumber package.
    4. Optionally specify the product version and click Install Package to start installation.

Installing Cucumber.js as a development dependency

  • Run the installation from the command line in the global mode:
    1. Launch the embedded Terminal by hovering your mouse pointer over show_tool_window_bars in the lower left corner of WebStorm and choosing Terminal from the menu (see Working with Embedded Local Terminal for details).
    2. Switch to the directory where NPM is stored or define a PATH variable for it so it is available from any folder, see Installing NodeJs.
    3. Type the following command at the command line prompt:
      npm install --dev cucumber
  • Run NPM from WebStorm using the Node.js and NPM page of the Settings dialog box.
    1. Open the Settings dialog box by choosing File | Settings or pressing Ctrl+Alt+S and click Node.js and NPM under Languages&Frameworks.
    2. On the Node.js and NPM page that opens, the Packages area shows all the Node.js-dependent packages that are currently installed on your computer, both at the global and at the project level. Click add.
    3. In the Available Packages dialog box that opens, select the cucumber package.
    4. Select the Options check box and type --dev in the text box next to it.
    5. Optionally specify the product version and click Install Package to start installation.

See Also

Last modified: 11 December 2014
comments powered by Disqus