TeamCity Cloud 2023.11 Help

Use Parameters in Build Chains

This topic illustrates how you can use TeamCity build parameters to exchange simple data between configurations of a build chain.

Access Parameters of Preceding Chain Builds

Dependent builds can access predefined and custom parameters of the previous chain builds as dep.<bcID>.<parameter_name>, where bcID is the name of a source build configuration whose parameter value you need to access.

Parameters in dependent builds

You can use dep... parameters to access parameters from a configuration even if the current configration has only indirect dependencies. For example, in the A → B → C chain where C depends on B and B depends on A, configuration C can access A's parameters.

The following build configuration builds and pushes a Docker image. The name of this image is written to the DockerImageName parameter.

TAG=v1 docker build -f Dockerfile --tag your.registry/MyApp:${TAG} docker push your.registry/MyApp:v1 echo "##teamcity[setParameter name='DockerImageName' value='MyApp:${TAG}']"

If this configuration's name is "ConfigA", builds executed further down the build chain can access the image name as dep.ConfigA.DockerImageName:

docker run -d your.registry/%dep.ConfigA.DockerImageName%

Override Parameters of Preceding Configurations

Add a parameter with the reverse.dep.<build_conf_ID>.<parameter_name> name syntax to override the <parameter_name> parameter defined in the target configuration that precedes the current configuration.

For example, the following Kotlin code defines a project with three build configurations united in a single build chain (ConfigA → ConfigB → ConfigC). Each build configuration has a chain.ConfigX.param parameter with its custom value. The last configuration has the additional reverse.dep.ChainConfigA.chain.ConfigA.param parameter.

import jetbrains.buildServer.configs.kotlin.* project { buildType(ChainConfigA) buildType(ChainConfigB) buildType(ChainConfigC) } object ChainConfigA : BuildType({ name = "ChainConfigA" params { param("chain.ConfigA.param", "Config A") } steps { script { scriptContent = """echo "Parameter value is: %chain.ConfigA.param%"""" } } }) object ChainConfigB : BuildType({ name = "ChainConfigB" params { param("chain.ConfigB.param", "Config B") } steps { script { scriptContent = """echo "Parameter value is: %chain.ConfigB.param%"""" } } dependencies { snapshot(ChainConfigA) { reuseBuilds = ReuseBuilds.NO } } }) object ChainConfigC : BuildType({ name = "ChainConfigC" params { param("chain.ConfigC.param", "Config C") param("reverse.dep.ChainConfigA.chain.ConfigA.param", "Value Overridden in ConfigC") } steps { script { scriptContent = """echo "Parameter value is: %chain.ConfigC.param%"""" } } dependencies { snapshot(ChainConfigB) { reuseBuilds = ReuseBuilds.NO } } })

If you run the ConfigA or the ConfigA → ConfigB sub-chain, the first configuration will report its original parameter value.

# ConfigA build log Parameter value is: Config A

However, if you run a full build chain that ends with ConfigC, this last configuration will feed ConfigA a custom parameter value.

# ConfigA build log Parameter value is: Value Overridden in ConfigC

You can use * wildcards in parameter names to the same parameters in multiple preceding configurations. For example, the ConfigC in the following sample has the reverse.dep.ChainConfig*.MyParam parameter, which overrides MyParam in both ConfigA and ConfigB.

object ChainConfigA : BuildType({ params { param("MyParam", "OriginalValue_A") } }) object ChainConfigB : BuildType({ params { param("MyParam", "OriginalValue_B") } dependencies { snapshot(ChainConfigA) { reuseBuilds = ReuseBuilds.NO } } }) object ChainConfigC : BuildType({ params { param("reverse.dep.ChainConfig*.MyParam", "CustomValue_C") } dependencies { snapshot(ChainConfigB) { reuseBuilds = ReuseBuilds.NO } } })

Conflicting Parameter Overrides

If in the ConfigA → ... → ConfigB → ... → ConfigC chain both ConfigB and ConfigC configurations try to override ConfigA's parameter ConfigC has a higher priority since it depends on ConfigB (either directly or through intermediate configurations).

object ChainConfigA : BuildType({ params { param("MyParam", "OriginalValue_A") } }) object ChainConfigB : BuildType({ params { // Lower priority param("reverse.dep.ChainConfigA.MyParam", "CustomValue_B") } // Depends on config A dependencies { snapshot(ChainConfigA) { reuseBuilds = ReuseBuilds.NO } } }) object ChainConfigC : BuildType({ params { // Higher priority param("reverse.dep.ChainConfigA.MyParam", "CustomValue_C") } // Depends on config B dependencies { snapshot(ChainConfigB) { reuseBuilds = ReuseBuilds.NO } } })

However, if ConfigB and ConfigC do not depend on each other, an ambiguity regarding which configuration should have a priority emerges. TeamCity tries to resolve this ambiguity by comparing parameter names and prioritizing a parameter with the most specific build configuration ID.

  • Highest priority: parameters with no wildcards in build configuration IDs (for example, reverse.dep.ChainConfigA.MyParam).

  • Medium priority: parameters with partial configuration IDs (for example, reverse.dep.Chain*A.MyParam). The more specific the target configuration ID is, the higher the priority of this parameter. For instance, the ChainConf*A ID has a priority over the Chain*A ID since it is considered more specific.

  • Lowest priority: parameters with the * wildcard instead of configuration IDs (for example, reverse.dep.*.MyParam).

If all conflicting configurations have similar parameter names and neither of them is a clear winner, TeamCity reports a conflict and creates additional conflict.<build_config_ID>.<parameter_name>=<value> parameters (one for each conflicting configuration).

object ChainConfigA : BuildType({ params { param("MyParam", "OriginalValue_A") } }) object ChainConfigB : BuildType({ params { // Equal priority param("reverse.dep.ChainConfigA.MyParam", "CustomValue_B") } // Depends on config A dependencies { snapshot(ChainConfigA) { reuseBuilds = ReuseBuilds.NO } } }) object ChainConfigC : BuildType({ params { // Equal priority param("reverse.dep.ChainConfigA.MyParam", "CustomValue_C") } // Depends on config A dependencies { snapshot(ChainConfigA) { reuseBuilds = ReuseBuilds.NO } } }) // Composite build configuration that runs the entire chain object ChainABC : BuildType({ type = BuildTypeSettings.Type.COMPOSITE dependencies { snapshot(ChainConfigB) {} snapshot(ChainConfigC) {} } })
Conflicting Overrides

Other Considerations

  • The reverse.dep.* parameters are processed on queuing a build where these parameters are defined. Since parameter values should be already known at this stage, these values must be assigned either in the build configuration or in the custom build dialog. Setting the parameter to a value calculated during a build has no effect.

  • Pushing a new parameter into a build overrides the "Do not run new build if there is a suitable one " snapshot dependency option and may trigger a new build if the parameter is set to a non-default value.

  • Values of the reverse.dep. parameters are pushed to the dependency builds "as is", without reference resolution. %-references, if any, will be resolved in the destination (target) build's scope.

Last modified: 25 October 2023